Prequel Trilogy,  The Clone Wars

Star Wars: The Clone Wars: new trailer and key art revealed for the final season

From StarWars.com:

“Continue, The Clone Wars will.

One of the most critically-acclaimed entries in the Star Wars saga will return for its epic conclusion with 12 all-new episodes on Disney+ beginning February 21. Today we got our first look at the colorful trailer for the final season of Star Wars: The Clone Wars, with glimpses from three exciting new story arcs, which you can watch below.

From Dave Filoni, director and executive producer of The Mandalorian, the new Clone Wars episodes will continue storylines introduced in the original series, exploring the events leading up to Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith.

Created by George Lucas, with Dave Filoni as executive producer/supervising director, Star Wars: The Clone Wars stars Matt Lanter as Anakin Skywalker, Ashley Eckstein as Ahsoka Tano, Dee Bradley Baker as Captain Rex and the clone troopers, James Arnold Taylor as Obi-Wan Kenobi, Katee Sackhoff as Bo-Katan, and Sam Witwer as Maul.

Check out the new key art below and don’t forget to tune in when Star Wars: The Clone Wars premieres February 21, streaming only on Disney+.

tcw_keyart


16 Comments

  • Alexrd

    hurr durr “The Jedi are keepers of the peace, not soldiers” hurr durr

    As if that didn’t come from the Jedi themselves or as if they don’t know that… The Jedi don’t fight in the war because they like to or because they see themselves as soldiers. They fight because they serve the Republic and it’s part of their duty to help protect it.

    This pretentious attempt at lecturing the good guys is not only a non sequitur but the repetitive hammering down makes it all cringeworthy.

    • Johann Potgieter

      “We’re keepers of the peace, not soldiers” is one of Mace Windu’s lines from Attack of the Clones. I think it’s meant to echo that in keeping with the prequels’ theme of the Jedi losing their way due to hubris.

      • Johann Potgieter

        In fact, now that I think about it, I think Mace Windu’s character is supposed to represent the hubris of the Jedi. His very first lines is “I do not believe the Sith could have returned without us knowing”. And in Revenge of the Sith Palpatine talks about how the Jedi and Sith are essentially the same, and that’s shown when both Palpatine and Mace say “he’s/was too dangerous to be left alive”. Eh, I’m just rambling a bit.

      • Alexrd

        But they didn’t lose their way to begin with, let alone due to hubris. That’s the current narrative they are pushing everywhere. The people in charge are condescendingly trying to hammer down a point that no one is arguing. No Jedi is happy that there is a war, no Jedi is pretending that they are soldiers. The Jedi are in the war because they serve the Republic and it’s part of their duty to protect it. They want nothing more than to end the war as soon as possible. They are pandering a message that Lucas didn’t subscribe to.

        It is a Mace Windu line. The line exists in the movie to explain the audience why the Republic is debating the creation of a clone army if they already have the Jedi. The Jedi are not soldiers. They are not a solution to a massive separatist attack if it were to happen. That’s why the creation of an army is being discussed. To assist the Jedi in the pockets of conflict that already exist at the beginning of Attack of the Clones. Lucas even explains this in the commentary.

    • Johann Potgieter

      What about in Clone Wars (still under George Lucas) where the Jedi are clearly shown to have “become the very thing they sought to destroy”? The episodes with Pong Krell (I know Dark Jedi probably existed in all periods, but I think the episode was meant to illustrate the corrupting power of, well, power and war), and especially with Yoda (the embodiment of the Jedi) literally fighting his hubris and coming to understand that the Jedi needed to be broken down or “pruned”, if you will, in order for them to be reborn as something pure, i.e. Luke, whose attachment to his father brought him closer to the light, as opposed to Anakin’s attachment to Padmé pushed him into the dark.

  • Johann Potgieter

    What about in Clone Wars (still under George Lucas) where the Jedi are clearly shown to have “become the very thing they sought to destroy”? The episodes with Pong Krell (I know Dark Jedi probably existed in all periods, but I think the episode was meant to illustrate the corrupting power of, well, power and war), and especially with Yoda (the embodiment of the Jedi) literally fighting his hubris and coming to understand that the Jedi needed to be broken down or “pruned”, if you will, in order for them to be reborn as something pure, i.e. Luke, whose attachment to his father brought him closer to the light, as opposed to Anakin’s attachment to Padmé pushed him into the dark.

    • Alexrd

      “The Jedi have become the very thing they sought to destroy”?! Where and when did that happen?

      1. Pong Krell is not “the Jedi”. He was a Jedi before he fell by ditching their ways (just like Dooku did before and Anakin eventually came to do). If anything, that’s an indication that the Jedi way is right and should be followed.

      2. Yoda faced the dark side (which exists in all living beings). A dark side that he never gave into.

      3. “coming to understand that the Jedi needed to be broken down or pruned” Not only is that not part of the episodes, but that’s not what it was about at all.

      4. Luke had no attachment to his father. He had compassion for him. Attachment is not compassion. Attachment is greed and selfishness, compassion is selflessness. The latter is part of the Jedi way (both in the prequels and in the originals), the former is not.

  • Johann Potgieter

    I didn’t say Pong Krell was the Jedi, but that he served as an example of what could happen to individual Jedi. As for Yoda, remember that George Lucas is very fond of archetypes and symbolism, think Palpatine literally destroying the senate in a battle between the embodiments of the Sith and Jedi. Yoda didn’t give into the Dark Side, yes, but he was “pruned” of certain parts of himself. In the episodes he saw an illusion of what the Jedi thought they were, Dooku even talking about adventures when Yoda disapproves of the idea of adventure in Episode V, he also says to Obi-Wan and Mace Windu that he doesn’t think the war can be one, that to me was his realization that the Jedi would inevitably be destroyed, and since nothing just happens in Star Wars, it’s the will of the Force. I just think that Yoda’s whole journey was meant to bridge the gap between his behaviour in the prequels and originals. And I’d argue that Luke did have some attachment to Anakin, especially with him denying that Anakin is dying.

    But look, I don’t really want to spend all evening going back and forth. We can all enjoy Star Wars in our own ways.

      • Johann Potgieter

        @archdukeofnaboo Thanks! I’ll gladly check it out later after work.

        I also jusy remembered the episodes with Baris calling the Jedi out on how they’ve been corrupted. Yes, she fell to the Dark Side, but the way it was framed makes it seem like she’s right. After all, the Jedi fought for the Republic, but the Republic was already rotten.

  • Moose

    Just because I have no idea since I have only ever seen maybe two episodes of The Clone Wars, what was/is the general reaction to bringing Darth Maul back after his (seeming) demise at the end of TPM?

    • archdukeofnaboo

      @Moose

      Generally very positive. It was, after all, Lucas’ decision.

      I’d highly recommend watching the series. As long as you can stick it out through the first coupe of episodes, you’re be in for a treat!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *