Games,  Prequel Trilogy

See some concept art for the junkyard of Republic ships in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order

From io9:

“[…] Being published by Dark Horse next month, The Art of Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order will take a deep dive into the Rise-of-the-Empire galaxy EA and Respawn’s latest Star Wars game is set in. […]

io9 has got another exclusive look inside the book you can check out below, showcasing Bracca, a junkyard planet where scrappers pick apart old Republic military tech like cruisers and AT-TEs, no longer needed in a galaxy where the Republic has given way to a new Galactic Empire. […]”

bracca02.jpg


From Nerdist:

“[…] In our first exclusive page from the art book, we see concept paintings of the junkyard planet Bracca. This Mid Rim planet was the site of many battles during the Clone Wars, and in the timeline of Fallen Order is operated by the Scrapper Guild, who breakdown starship wreckage they sell to the Empire.

bracca03.jpg

A blurb at the bottom of this page—which accompanies a portrait piece of Bracca—reads:

Many Venator-class Star Destroyers were decommissioned and scrapped in the early years of Imperial rule to contribute parts of the growing Imperial war machine. The Venator was a symbol of the Republic and therefore swiftly decommissioned in favor of the Victory– and Imperial-class Star Destroyers, which are synonymous with the Empire.

[…]”

0 Comments

    • Cryogenic

      @ Thulsa:

      Jakku for prequel fans, indeed. It even has a similar name: “Bracca”. This Wookiepedia page contains a bit more information and an additional image:

      https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Bracca

      Now, as your ascription implies, this is the more intelligent and visually-striking execution of the concept of a “starship graveyard”. The colours, the rain, the mist, and the bleached skies give the location a purgatorial, “Blade Runner”-type feel — considerably more forlorn and atmospheric than just dumping a bunch of overly-familiar OT Imperial designs on a phoned-in version of Tatooine.

      There’s a tinge of “Rogue One”‘s Eadu at work in these images, too.

      Well, sue me. I like me some bleak, rained-over Star Wars planets.

      It comes to something when a video game spin-off is more imaginative and sumptuous-looking than a major high-budget Star Wars movie.

      Or, again, maybe I just really like me some moody Star Wars planets — which, let’s face it, are a better way to honour the prequels than coming out with a bunch of uninspired OT knockoffs.

  • archdukeofnaboo

    But according to Palpatine’s ideology in RotS, the “Empire” is but a logical evolution of the Republic. It’s a long process which starts when Palpatine becomes Supreme Chancellor in Episode I.

    Don’t give me any of this “The Venator was a symbol of the Republic and therefore swiftly” nonsense – it makes zero sense. Why the hell do you think Palpatine didn’t fully remove the Senate until Episode IV, 19 years later? Creating the illusion of the empire saving the Republic was very important, that’s why!

    Who is writing this rubbish?

    • Cryogenic

      @ Arch Duke:

      Although Palpatine didn’t dissolve the Senate until Episode IV, he *did* declare the Empire from the Senate pulpit in Episode III, and we see proto-Star Destroyers, flanked by proto-TIE Fighters, manned by Imperial officers at the end of that movie.

      Tech was already rapidly evolving to its familiar “OT” state in the PT, and the end of ROTS clarifies that this transformation is still occurring within the timeframe of the final prequel. There is also this exchange in a deleted scene:

      PADME
      Do you think he will dismantle the Senate?

      MON MOTHMA
      Why bother? As a practical matter, the Senate no longer exists.

      The Empire was founded on the premise that more threats to the Republic’s “stability and security” were incoming, and that therefore an Empire was needed to protect the lives of its citizens and keep strife and suffering at bay. Of course, this is all on the terms of the Emperor and the corporate and militant factions within the Republic that he brought under his control.

      Or as Palpatine sneakily tells Padme in Episode II: “I realise that additional security may be disruptive for you.” That’s more or less the concept of “empire” in a nutshell. Or as Benjamin Franklin cogently put it: “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”

      Palpatine made good on his “threat” to Amidala — as a direct consequence of the “additional security” that he was developing and intending to swallow the Republic with, including his manipulation of Anakin to do his bidding, Padme (the embodiment of Franklin’s “Liberty” within the PT era) is “disrupted” by being choked by Anakin and losing the will to live.

      The Republic changed more than most people realised, or in the words of Padme’s security chief, “[were] willing to admit”. People had deceived themselves into believing gunships and armed troopers were a temporary measure to “counter the increasing threats of the Separatists”, which Palpatine had promised to do away with “once this crisis has abated”, but like all dictators, he lied by omission and clung onto his powers indefinitely.

      By the end of ROTS, as Padme tried conveying to Anakin — “What if the Republic has become the very evil we’ve been fighting to destroy?” — the Republic has officially become a police state, and its machines of oppression more closely resemble the “grey” machinations of Palpatine and all those who helped him, willingly or inadvertently, gain more and more power and impose his dark will on the galaxy.

      • Cryogenic

        @ Joe:

        They’re good scenes, indeed. The narrative of ROTS works perfectly well without them, but they do give Padme significantly more screen time, and they also help undergird the political storyline of the PT, illustrating how Palpatine’s subversion of the Republic is more or less a “fait accompli” by the third prequel.

        Even with the Senate theoretically intact, Bail and Padme standing for democracy, and a Jedi Order (albeit a compromised/fractioning one) still giving the appearance of justice and hope for the future, Palpatine and the organs of commerce have effectively won and destroyed the Republic from within.

        Yet the additional scenes involving Padme at least give a sense of certain actors within the Republic fighting back. And the presence of Jar Jar in some of these scenes is also key, helping to highlight an important Star Wars theme: even when you have made a mistake with terrible consequences (as Jar Jar did when proposing the Senate grant Palpatine emergency powers), it isn’t too late to attempt to return to the good fight and make amends. It says something positive for Amidala that Jar Jar is still serving with her; she didn’t strike him off in anger for his transgression. She recognises his value still.

        Last but not least, the deleted scenes also show Palpatine working on Anakin in an even more insidious way, as he stealthily chips at the foundations of Anakin’s trust in his wife, enlarging Anakin’s insecurities and driving a wedge between the secret lovers, leading to their tragic fates. The deletion of these scenes, while understandable, is certainly lamentable.

      • archdukeofnaboo

        @Cryogenic

        Not a bad summary of the Republic’s transformation into the Empire. None of that cartoonish evil-doer described in the nonsense above, but a skilled manipulative menace undoing a democracy from within.

      • Cryogenic

        @ Arch Duke:

        Thanks. But what part of the description given above falls within “cartoonish evil-doer” territory?

        All it talks about is a junkyard planet owned or operated by a faction called the Scrapper Guild — already a more believable scenario than hulking machines of war left to bake in the sun and be scavenged by nobodies in exchange for meagre food portions in some random bazaar. What I’m saying is it seems far-fetched that discarded tech like this wouldn’t be overseen by some commercial entity. Just think of all that precious metal in the enormous hulls of the various spacecraft. It’s also more consistent with the prequels, which have talk of Commerce Guilds and Trade Federations (and a Mining Guild is mentioned in TESB) and repeatedly show economic niches on various worlds, where raw material is tapped and exploited (e.g., the lava workers on Mustafar).

        I think I addressed your ship design complaint. I did, however, get a detail wrong. Apparently, the Star Destroyers seen at the end of ROTS are also the same as those seen at the start of the film: i.e., Venator-class. Nevertheless, they have a different paint job — monochromatic grey evocative of the classic Star Destroyers of the OT — and, as I said earlier, they are accompanied by a new class of fighter craft (some evolution from the Jedi starfighters seen earlier in the film). So things are still “on the move” at the end of the PT. Venator to Victory. I think that’s a neat transition. I don’t hold it against them for evolving the designs a bit more in the twenty-year gap between ROTS and ANH. The prequels cover a span of time less than this, and yet we get significant design development. Even in the three-year span between AOTC and ROTS, tech moves on considerably.

        There really is little of the Republic left by the time Anakin and Obi-Wan have rescued Palpatine from the Invisible Hand. They are serving a dead institution. All victories in the PT — certainly military ones — are Pyrrhic victories. This is nicely symbolised by Obi-Wan praising Anakin for killing Dooku after they have “happily” landed. Obi-Wan is commending Anakin for performing an extra-judicial murder; and all he did was remove the guy so he could take his place! It’s interesting that Obi-Wan never truly acknowledges this fact. He may run to tell Padme that after Anakin killed Dooku he became Palpatine’s new apprentice, but he was earlier quite jubilant about the fact that Anakin took Dooku’s life. This is how Palpatine wins. The characters are so blind to their own unexamined and suppressed dark sides, it’s easy for them to make bad choices and embrace evil, while believing themselves to be good.

        This all has a bearing on how the Republic looks at the end of the movie. With a good chunk of the galaxy taken over by the Republic, and no Jedi left to stop the process (indeed, they helped the process), the naked militarism that the Republic embraced no longer needs to be hidden. And again, given Palpatine’s speech in the Senate, the ships becoming even more focused and deadly is simply him making good on his decree that “the Republic will be reorganised into the First Galactic Empire”. If Palpatine was attempting to trick people into believing he was saving the Republic, his maniacal speech is at odds with that goal. Even the Republic’s eight-spoked wheel crest is re-branded into the six-geared Imperial cog. You can witness the birth of this symbol at the end of ROTS, during an overhead shot of Anakin laid out on the operating table, with six light panels circumscribing his wrecked body from the floor below.

        The idea that Palpatine was trying to preserve the Republic was a false notion he floated out in Episodes I and II, and for the first half of Episode III. Once he had “exposed” the Jedi plot to “overthrow” him, he threw off the pretence of preserving democracy like an unwanted cape, revealing something closer to his true intentions all along. He was remaking the Republic in his own image, and others were going to be punished for their insolence and their disobedience.

        I think seeing these downed, mouldering cruisers — once dreadful portents of war — in a forsaken state, yet still bearing the old colours of the once-august Republic, is a much more chilling and effective statement than the downed/forgotten behemoths we see littering Jakku. Here it’s like nobility itself has fallen and been left to decay. A reminder of the final days of the Republic, even as it was being consumed by tyranny and greed. A mausoleum to the Jedi Order itself.

      • archdukeofnaboo

        @Cryogenic

        I’m trying to address Palpatine’s ideology, and put it in context, and you’ve gone off on an extra long summary of the films that I’m more than familiar with.

        Palpatine sees the Empire as the evolution of the Republic, which saves it from the turmoil of the Clone Wars. Of course I don’t agree with this interpretation, but that’s the way the master manipulator purports it, and it’s important to recognise and understand this. Yes their is a hidden motive from the Dark Lord, but the genius of it was that the Republic was in a situation where it really did need urgent reform.

        My point is that it completely undermines the devastatingly cruel and malicious villain of the PT by having him come up with the simple-minded nonsense written in the above article. It is the outlook of a cartoonish bad guy, who raises his finger and bellows “Clone Wars venators bad now. Destroy them!” instead of the sinister master-mind who managed to convince the most of a Galactic Senate and population that good was just a point of view, and that extraordinary security was needed to secure their civilisation. Only the latter is an evil an adult can believe in, and this highlights the writing of the prequels as far more thoughtful that they’re given credit for.

        For the record, I also disagree with the story idea of the Clone soldiers being quickly replaced after the events of RotS. There’s 19 years until ANH and there is little need to force things into place so hurriedly. They worked outstandingly in the war and nailed Order 66: why the heck should they suddenly be withdrawn? It’s a plot hole with no believable answer.

        In case you haven’t spotted it, I’m analysing the saga from a chronological basis. That is, the PT as the first events of the story, which are interesting in of themselves, and not something that exists purely to serve the original films.

      • archdukeofnaboo

        @Cryogenic

        If I’m an ordinary citizen of the Galaxy in 18 BBY I have no reason to believe anything other than the Empire being the logical evolution of the Republic. The whole Republic-Empire thing is a false dichotomy that will only come to to my attention years later thanks to the propaganda of the Rebellion movement.

      • Cryogenic

        @ Arch Duke:

        “I’m trying to address Palpatine’s ideology, and put it in context, and you’ve gone off on an extra long summary of the films that I’m more than familiar with.”

        Yeah, well, frankly… I don’t know what you’re arguing about, or why you phrased it that way. You earlier praised that same summation, but now you exude a less-than-salutary tone.

        I was also addressing Palpatine’s ideology. Ideology is always written out in the real-world on some level. And in Star Wars, that means studying the progression of ships, weapons, clothing, speech patterns, planet settings, etc. — all the forms at play that comprise the symbolic minutiae of the allegorical dreamspace, which the artist has fashioned and made sensible to the intellect.

        Palpatine’s true intentions, in other words, are shown by the transformations that occur around him, in the external world in which the characters operate. Or as Mace puts it in ROTS: “The Dark Side of the Force surrounds the Chancellor.” Of course, not everyone is a Jedi, and you can even read projection into Mace’s remark, but some people were beginning to recoil to what was happening to the Republic. Many people in the galaxy may have been burying their heads in the sand, but that doesn’t mean there weren’t abundant signs to people looking up that things had begun to head in a dark direction.

        “My point is that it completely undermines the devastatingly cruel and malicious villain of the PT by having him come up with the simple-minded nonsense written in the above article. It is the outlook of a cartoonish bad guy, who raises his finger and bellows “Clone Wars venators bad now. Destroy them!””

        But why are you attributing the decommissioning of a class of Republic cruisers to Palpatine? It’s not like the Republic/Empire is run by him and him alone — despite his enormous power. You seem to be reading this story choice as some grand insult to Palpatine, but I don’t see how a bunch of abandoned designs automatically nullifies the Clone Wars or his scheming as a whole. Different classes of Star Destroyer vessel have existed in extended canon for a while. This isn’t something they’ve just pulled from the ether.

        “instead of the sinister master-mind who managed to convince the most of a Galactic Senate and population that good was just a point of view, and that extraordinary security was needed to secure their civilisation.”

        This second piece of your sentence, when set against the first part, just reads to me as a false dilemma; or the fallacy of the excluded middle. “Only a Sith deals in absolutes.” It could be argued, in fact, that even colder-looking Star Destroyers and other Republic vehicles with a grim appearance are outward expressions of that self-same “extraordinary security”. Palpatine promised to enact stiffer measures, and he followed through on that. Dictators and would-be dictators don’t always lie. It was only when people realised how much freedom they were losing — or had already lost — that some of them decided to get organised and fight back.

        “For the record, I also disagree with the story idea of the Clone soldiers being quickly replaced after the events of RotS. There’s 19 years until ANH and there is little need to force things into place so hurriedly. They worked outstandingly in the war and nailed Order 66: why the heck should they suddenly be withdrawn? It’s a plot hole with no believable answer.”

        I blame George Lucas for that. He constructed a very compressed timeline. Sometimes, I think, if were able to go back and revise the entry-point for his saga (i.e., “A New Hope”), he’d probably make some revisions (beyond the cosmetic changes of the Special Editions). It’s a serious credit to his incredible worldbuilding mind that Star Wars works half as well as it does. Lucas even chuckles on the ROTS commentary track about the Death Star conveniently appearing at the end of Episode III and taking so long to build in the interim (“labour disputes”, IIRC, was his little self-effacing quip). If it were Rian Johnson giving the commentary track, I bet there’d be dozens of videos roasting him for it, right now, on YouTube.

        Lucas also deserves blame for the confusion surrounding the disparity between clones and stormtroopers. He never really bothered to clarify what happens to all the clones after the Clone Wars. I mean, something obviously happens to them, because the stormtroopers of the OT vary in height, voice, and are clearly much more bungling and inept. There is quite a contrast here between the trilogies. In the PT, we get deadly clones that we see waging war on many battlefields and brutally wiping out their Jedi generals. In the OT, we basically get keystone cops. That seems to be because Lucas was thinking more of his robot-police from THX when he made the OT. But in the PT, he needed the clones to be a credible threat, capable of crushing worlds and vanquishing thousands of Jedi on the utterance of a single command.

        “In case you haven’t spotted it, I’m analysing the saga from a chronological basis. That is, the PT as the first events of the story, which are interesting in of themselves, and not something that exists purely to serve the original films.”

        I do like your perspective here. The prequels are valuable and cherishable in their own right. However, storytellers and artists working in the narrow (but dense) interstice between the PT and OT need some latitude in how they interpret events, in my opinion. The clone-stormtrooper issue you flagged up is a good example of how people who aren’t George Lucas have inherited a problem, and it is up to them to come up with certain solutions and workarounds. Naturally, their choices and interpretations might not jibe with yours, but in a complex storytelling universe as vast and kooky as Star Wars, that is probably inevitable.

      • archdukeofnaboo

        @Cryogenic

        I suppose it can’t all be perfect. When you apply enough stress to a popular piece of fiction, it will appear lacking and incongruent on several fronts. For example, the fine details of Palpatine’s parliamentary majority are never explored (even in the TCW show) though they are undoubtedly there, somewhere. Believe me, the PT could have go way more in depth here if it wanted, so to those people who complained about prequel politics: you don’t care about democracy as much as you think you do.

        “It’s not like the Republic/Empire is run by him and him alone — despite his enormous power”

        I’d like to think that. That would be more sensible. There are always willing collaborators that come with a regime.

        You’d likely be right about Johnson and the Death Star. However, he knew what he was getting his hands into when he took it upon himself to make a Star Wars. It’s like running for PM or President: if you don’t want to deal with the heavy scrutiny that will come, it’s very simple, don’t run – nobody is forcing you to run.

        Lucas may be a Disney shareholder, but it’s folks like Kennedy and the story group calling the shots with the mythology now. They had a nice opportunity to devise a more realistic, gradual phasing out of the Clone army, that would have taken a couple of years, but instead its suddenly dissolved for no other reason that to cozy up to the storyline of A New Hope as fast as possible. It’s ridiculous. And, in case you’re wondering, yes, I much prefer the Clone Army to the Stromtrooper Army. The Clone Wars animation fleshes these guys out so, so well, and while people now like to retroactively call the program the “Ahsoka Tano show”, the Republic’s soldiers were every bit as prominent and heroic in it.

        If you think that’s bad Cryo, just wait until you read the incompetent mess that is the “New Republic” described in the books. Worse, it’s utterly thankless to the 1,000 year original Republic, which boasted so many achievements despite being toppled by Palpatine in the end. I’m hoping a TV series set after Episode VI will eventually be able to wipe the slate and re-do the whole thing.

    • Michael Kelly

      I would not say Palpatine’s ideology was that the Empire was an evolution of the Republic. I think Palpatine’s ideologies are not driven by evolution of a government or political ideologies, but rather by his Sith ideology of trying to find a way to replace the Republic with a system in which the Sith can further influence the galaxy. One needs to remember that Palpatine is the fake face, Darth Sidious is the true face of the man that becomes Emperor. Darth Sidious knows that people would never accept a Sith Lord as a leader. So it is important to remember that what Palpatine tells the people is not really what he truly thinks.

      • archdukeofnaboo

        @Michael

        The Empire is literally an evolution of the Republic. Please understand that “evolution” doesn’t imply any judgement other than the structure of the galactic state morphing over time. There was no coup d’etat, there was no revolution, only the gradual degradation of the Republic into a shell of its former self.

        Of course it’s a mask. But the thing is that disguised Sith Lord is not always blatantly wrong in what he saids. Darth Sidious was never more evil than he was in Episode III.

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